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Repeated Injections of Botox into the Masseter Muscle... A Longitudinal Study

The authors of this study examined mandibular bone before and after subjects received Botox injections into each masseter muscle. These volunteers were healthy adults (22-48 years old), both male and female, who wanted injections to slim their faces.

Washington Post Article on TMD

The Washington Post recently featured an article on Temporomandibular Disorders. Below is an excerpt from that article and a link to the full story.

Partnering to Improve Chronic Pain Care

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) held three meetings this summer with the goal of developing the first public-private partnership (PPP) to develop safe and effective treatments for chronic pain, as well as new treatments for opioid addiction and overdose.

TMJ Patient RoundTable Project: Status Update

The TMJ Association is acting as the catalyst to develop the TMJ Patient RoundTable, a broad initiative to advance the interests of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). It encompasses collaborations with all stakeholders and

Educational Brochures on Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions

This brochure addresses what are Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions (COPCs), how COPCs are diagnosed, the complexity of the chronic pain experience, and how to work with your health care provider to develop a treatment plan. It is available by postal ma

ARTHROTOMY

  • Jun 18, 2014

Arthrotomy, also known as Arthroplasty, is an open joint procedure done under general anesthesia in the hospital. The recovery is significantly longer, three to eight8 weeks, and more painful than the TMJ Arthrocentesis or TMJ Arthroscopy.

An incision is made similar to a face lift incision (along the ear), and the joint space is exposed for the surgeon to see. This allows for the removal of adhesions, osteophytes (bone spurs), fibrous or bony ankylosis (fusion), tumors, etc. This reshaping of the joint is called Arthroplasty.

The surgeon can also repair discs by suturing them into place (Discoplasty), remove discs (Discectomy), or implant anything from a temporalis muscle graft, to a rib. Some of the types of various procedures that are done through an open joint operation.

  • Discoplasty. This inovolves surgically putting the disc back into its normal position when it is displaced.
  • Discectomy. This provides disc removal. Some surgeons use a temporalis muscle or dermal graft to replace the disc.  Others do not put anything in its place.
  • Arthroplasty. Reshaping of the condyle and fossa when there are arthritic changes.
  • Temporalis Muscle Graft. A piece of your temple muscle (temporalis) is slid into the joint space to prevent bone on bone contact.
  • Temporary Silicone Implants. Silicone sheeting has been used in the past to act as a pseudo-disc. Silicone sheeting specifically marketed for the TMJ was voluntarily withdrawn from the market in 1993. After the TMJ implant fiasco of the early ninties, the FDA asked for pre-market approval on ALL devices to be implanted in the TMJ.  No company submitted the required safety testing or pre-market approval paperwork for silicone. If a doctor mentions using silicone, he is doing it off-label. Beware! The FDA says on its Consumer Information page, “FDA is presently working with manufacturers to appropriately label silicone sheeting with warnings against its use in the TMJ implant.”
  • Rib Grafts. These are used to replace the condyle.

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