Read the Latest News

Scientific News: Sleep and TMD

Dr. Anne Sanders was kind enough to write the following synopsis of a recent study on sleep and TMD.     A recent study of the OPPERA group reported in The Journal of Pain, sheds new light on the understanding of poor sleep in relation

TMJA Office Update - Spring 2016

After President Obama submits his budget to Congress, the work of Representatives and Senators begins. It is at this time that we tell our elected officials what YOU, TMJ patients, need to have addressed. The past two months have been busy ones outsid

National Pain Study Released

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently released the National Pain Strategy, outlining the federal government's first coordinated plan for reducing the burden of chronic pain that affects millions of Americans. Developed by a diverse team of experts from around the nation, the National Pain Strategy is a road map toward achieving a system of care in which all people receive appropriate, high quality and evidence-based care for pain.

New Safety Warnings Added to Prescription Opioid Drugs

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a consumer warning regarding several safety issues with the entire class of opioid pain medicines. The new safety risks include potentially harmful interactions with numerous other medications, problems with the adrenal glands, and decreased sex hormone levels. The FDA is requiring companies to make changes to the opioid medication labels warning consumers of these risks as described below.

Unclear Results of Botulinum Toxin Therapy for TMD Pain

Increasingly, clinicians, research scientists like myself, and advocates at The TMJ Association are asked, "What about Botox® therapy for treatment of my painful muscles? Does it help?"

ARTHROTOMY

  • Jun 18, 2014

Arthrotomy, also known as Arthroplasty, is an open joint procedure done under general anesthesia in the hospital. The recovery is significantly longer, three to eight8 weeks, and more painful than the TMJ Arthrocentesis or TMJ Arthroscopy.

An incision is made similar to a face lift incision (along the ear), and the joint space is exposed for the surgeon to see. This allows for the removal of adhesions, osteophytes (bone spurs), fibrous or bony ankylosis (fusion), tumors, etc. This reshaping of the joint is called Arthroplasty.

The surgeon can also repair discs by suturing them into place (Discoplasty), remove discs (Discectomy), or implant anything from a temporalis muscle graft, to a rib. Some of the types of various procedures that are done through an open joint operation.

  • Discoplasty. This inovolves surgically putting the disc back into its normal position when it is displaced.
  • Discectomy. This provides disc removal. Some surgeons use a temporalis muscle or dermal graft to replace the disc.  Others do not put anything in its place.
  • Arthroplasty. Reshaping of the condyle and fossa when there are arthritic changes.
  • Temporalis Muscle Graft. A piece of your temple muscle (temporalis) is slid into the joint space to prevent bone on bone contact.
  • Temporary Silicone Implants. Silicone sheeting has been used in the past to act as a pseudo-disc. Silicone sheeting specifically marketed for the TMJ was voluntarily withdrawn from the market in 1993. After the TMJ implant fiasco of the early ninties, the FDA asked for pre-market approval on ALL devices to be implanted in the TMJ.  No company submitted the required safety testing or pre-market approval paperwork for silicone. If a doctor mentions using silicone, he is doing it off-label. Beware! The FDA says on its Consumer Information page, “FDA is presently working with manufacturers to appropriately label silicone sheeting with warnings against its use in the TMJ implant.”
  • Rib Grafts. These are used to replace the condyle.

Back to Surgery