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CFC 2017 Fall Campaign Begins

If you are a government employee who understands the full impact of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) on individuals, their loved ones and society-at-large, please help us to continue to change the face of TMJ by designating The TMJ Association as your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) charity #12102.

Patients Needed in Baltimore MD Area: Study on Genetics and Facial, Jaw and Headache Pain

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Nursing asked us to post the following announcement on a research opportunity at the University of Maryland.

Hot & Cold Packs: Most Effective Therapy

In a survey the TMJA conducted of TMD patients, the most frequently used intervention (65% of respondents) was thermal therapy (hot or cold compresses) to the jaw; these were also found by 74% of the respondents to result in a reduction of symptoms.

Emerging Research on Orofacial Pain

In 2011, the Institute of Medicine published a report documenting that at least 100 million U.S. adults-more than the number afflicted by heart disease, diabetes, and cancer combined-suffer from common chronic pain conditions that persist for ≥3 mo ("Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research,").

Painful Temporomandibular Disorder: Decade of Discovery from OPPERA Studies

In 2006, the OPPERA project (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment) set out to identify risk factors for development of painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A decade later, this review summarizes its key findings.

ARTHROTOMY

  • Jun 18, 2014

Arthrotomy, also known as Arthroplasty, is an open joint procedure done under general anesthesia in the hospital. The recovery is significantly longer, three to eight8 weeks, and more painful than the TMJ Arthrocentesis or TMJ Arthroscopy.

An incision is made similar to a face lift incision (along the ear), and the joint space is exposed for the surgeon to see. This allows for the removal of adhesions, osteophytes (bone spurs), fibrous or bony ankylosis (fusion), tumors, etc. This reshaping of the joint is called Arthroplasty.

The surgeon can also repair discs by suturing them into place (Discoplasty), remove discs (Discectomy), or implant anything from a temporalis muscle graft, to a rib. Some of the types of various procedures that are done through an open joint operation.

  • Discoplasty. This inovolves surgically putting the disc back into its normal position when it is displaced.
  • Discectomy. This provides disc removal. Some surgeons use a temporalis muscle or dermal graft to replace the disc.  Others do not put anything in its place.
  • Arthroplasty. Reshaping of the condyle and fossa when there are arthritic changes.
  • Temporalis Muscle Graft. A piece of your temple muscle (temporalis) is slid into the joint space to prevent bone on bone contact.
  • Temporary Silicone Implants. Silicone sheeting has been used in the past to act as a pseudo-disc. Silicone sheeting specifically marketed for the TMJ was voluntarily withdrawn from the market in 1993. After the TMJ implant fiasco of the early ninties, the FDA asked for pre-market approval on ALL devices to be implanted in the TMJ.  No company submitted the required safety testing or pre-market approval paperwork for silicone. If a doctor mentions using silicone, he is doing it off-label. Beware! The FDA says on its Consumer Information page, “FDA is presently working with manufacturers to appropriately label silicone sheeting with warnings against its use in the TMJ implant.”
  • Rib Grafts. These are used to replace the condyle.

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