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TMJA's Eighth Scientific Meeting Call for Posters

Students and research fellows are especially encouraged to submit abstracts for this session and to apply for travel awards. Up to six awards will be given. Abstracts submitted by students and fellows seeking travel awards will be judged by a the TMJA’s scientific advisors. The registration fee for award recipients will also be waived. Additionally, accepted poster abstracts will be published in the journal, Molecular Pain.

Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Eighth Scientific Meeting of The TMJ Association

The Eighth Scientific Meeting of The TMJ Association - How Can Precision Medicine Be Applied to Temporomandibular Disorders and its Comorbidities? Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, Bethesda, Maryland, September 11-13, 2016

Professional Opportunity at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry seeks to appoint a full-time, tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the Department of Endodontics and in the Center for Pain Research and Innovation.  The can

How Accurate Are Dental Websites When It Comes to TMD?

In an eye-opening article to be published shortly in the journal Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, authors Desai, Alkandari, and Laskin address the critical issue of the accuracy of information published on dental websites about the cause and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMJ/TMD).

ARTHROTOMY

  • Jun 18, 2014

Arthrotomy, also known as Arthroplasty, is an open joint procedure done under general anesthesia in the hospital. The recovery is significantly longer, three to eight8 weeks, and more painful than the TMJ Arthrocentesis or TMJ Arthroscopy.

An incision is made similar to a face lift incision (along the ear), and the joint space is exposed for the surgeon to see. This allows for the removal of adhesions, osteophytes (bone spurs), fibrous or bony ankylosis (fusion), tumors, etc. This reshaping of the joint is called Arthroplasty.

The surgeon can also repair discs by suturing them into place (Discoplasty), remove discs (Discectomy), or implant anything from a temporalis muscle graft, to a rib. Some of the types of various procedures that are done through an open joint operation.

  • Discoplasty. This inovolves surgically putting the disc back into its normal position when it is displaced.
  • Discectomy. This provides disc removal. Some surgeons use a temporalis muscle or dermal graft to replace the disc.  Others do not put anything in its place.
  • Arthroplasty. Reshaping of the condyle and fossa when there are arthritic changes.
  • Temporalis Muscle Graft. A piece of your temple muscle (temporalis) is slid into the joint space to prevent bone on bone contact.
  • Temporary Silicone Implants. Silicone sheeting has been used in the past to act as a pseudo-disc. Silicone sheeting specifically marketed for the TMJ was voluntarily withdrawn from the market in 1993. After the TMJ implant fiasco of the early ninties, the FDA asked for pre-market approval on ALL devices to be implanted in the TMJ.  No company submitted the required safety testing or pre-market approval paperwork for silicone. If a doctor mentions using silicone, he is doing it off-label. Beware! The FDA says on its Consumer Information page, “FDA is presently working with manufacturers to appropriately label silicone sheeting with warnings against its use in the TMJ implant.”
  • Rib Grafts. These are used to replace the condyle.

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