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Introducing our TMD Nutrition Guide

The pain and jaw dysfunction associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) can impact your ability to chew and swallow food. How and what you are able to eat can seriously compromise your nutritional and health status - an aspect of TMD that is often

New TMD Research Funding Opportunity

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research announced a new funding opportunity for scientists to conduct research on the Pharmacogenomics of Orofacial Pain Management (RO1) http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DE-16-001.html&n

TMD, Splints, & Sleep Disorders

The National Institutes of Health Brochure on TMJ Disorders states that stabilization splints are the most widely used treatments for TMJ disorders, however studies of their effectiveness in providing pain relief has been inconclusive. Stabilization spli

Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions Report Released

In September 2014, a meeting sponsored by the National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium was held to: Identify resources needed to enhance integration of existing data and optimize collection of data in the future to best advance research on ove

2015 TMD Senate Report Language

2015 Senate Report Language  For over 20 consecutive years, YOUR TMJA's advocacy efforts have resulted in Senate Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Services Appropriations Subcommittee report language

ARTHROTOMY

  • Jun 18, 2014

Arthrotomy, also known as Arthroplasty, is an open joint procedure done under general anesthesia in the hospital. The recovery is significantly longer, three to eight8 weeks, and more painful than the TMJ Arthrocentesis or TMJ Arthroscopy.

An incision is made similar to a face lift incision (along the ear), and the joint space is exposed for the surgeon to see. This allows for the removal of adhesions, osteophytes (bone spurs), fibrous or bony ankylosis (fusion), tumors, etc. This reshaping of the joint is called Arthroplasty.

The surgeon can also repair discs by suturing them into place (Discoplasty), remove discs (Discectomy), or implant anything from a temporalis muscle graft, to a rib. Some of the types of various procedures that are done through an open joint operation.

  • Discoplasty. This inovolves surgically putting the disc back into its normal position when it is displaced.
  • Discectomy. This provides disc removal. Some surgeons use a temporalis muscle or dermal graft to replace the disc.  Others do not put anything in its place.
  • Arthroplasty. Reshaping of the condyle and fossa when there are arthritic changes.
  • Temporalis Muscle Graft. A piece of your temple muscle (temporalis) is slid into the joint space to prevent bone on bone contact.
  • Temporary Silicone Implants. Silicone sheeting has been used in the past to act as a pseudo-disc. Silicone sheeting specifically marketed for the TMJ was voluntarily withdrawn from the market in 1993. After the TMJ implant fiasco of the early ninties, the FDA asked for pre-market approval on ALL devices to be implanted in the TMJ.  No company submitted the required safety testing or pre-market approval paperwork for silicone. If a doctor mentions using silicone, he is doing it off-label. Beware! The FDA says on its Consumer Information page, “FDA is presently working with manufacturers to appropriately label silicone sheeting with warnings against its use in the TMJ implant.”
  • Rib Grafts. These are used to replace the condyle.

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