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Hyperreactive Brain Network May Be Cause of Chronic Pain in Fibromyalgia, Study Suggests

Fibromyalgia is one of the overlapping pain conditions with TMD. This article appeared in Fibromyalgia News Today on January 15, 2018. A new study suggests a hyperreactive brain network may be the underlying cause of chronic pain in fibromyalgia.

Dry Eye Linked to Chronic Overlapping Pain in Veteran Population

There may be a correlation between dry eye and chronic pain in the US military veteran population as is evident by a recent study. Ocular pain was most strongly associated with headaches, tension headaches, migraines, temporomandibular joint disorders, pelvic pain, central pain syndrome, and fibromyalgia in the veteran patient population.

Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Why Head and Face Pain Cause More Suffering

Hate headaches? The distress you feel is not all in your -- well, head. People consistently rate pain of the head, face, eyeballs, ears and teeth as more disruptive, and more emotionally draining, than pain elsewhere in the body.

Migraine and Coronary Artery Disease: A Genetic Connection

There has long been as association between migraine headaches and vascular (blood vessel) dysfunction of some kind, underscored by epidemiological studies and other research. New evidence for a genetic connection now comes from the analysis of several large data sets of each condition based on Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

Graeme's Story

  • May 13, 2015

I am a 39-year-old TMJD sufferer living in Sydney, Australia. I was first diagnosed with TMJD in approximately 2003 after being concerned about my frequent headaches in the temple region.

I suffered with debilitating headaches as a child and then from adolescence through to adulthood. When I was about six years old, I fell from the top of a 20-foot waterfall onto rocks below. I now wonder if that or other childhood injuries were a contributing factor to my TMD.

Incidentally I was a teeth grinder when I was young and I believe I still clench at night. In 2002, I had all of my wisdom teeth removed, thinking that was the cause of my pain. Surprisingly my dentist at the time didn't even suggest I had a TMD. With debilitating migraine-style headaches continuing, I was determined to find out more. I eventually had a CAT scan to remove the possibility of tumors and it was following this that my TMD condition was diagnosed. Dental treatment led me to trying a mouthguard; however, I found this to be uncomfortable and ineffective.

I eventually saw a maxillofacial specialist in 2003. This visit provided me with an explanation for my condition and lead to physiotherapy treatment that initially tried to treat the condition through massage and jaw exercises. This didn't really work for me as it wasn't really helping my condition. I then just decided to live with the condition. When pain does occur I resort to long showers with pulsating water (or alternatively baths); however, these only provide temporary relief. I use paracetamol for pain relief and sometimes take Mersyndol to help with a sound night's sleep. I'm not sure that the paracetamol is really that effective.

Moving onto early 2008 I set about shedding some excess weight. To the end of 2010 I've lost 40kg (88lb) through a significant amount of exercise. I now hike regularly and cycled 4000km last year! With work getting quite busy, I haven't made the time for this level of regular exercise. On 18 July 2011 I had a debilitating migraine caused by my TMD. This lead me to read more about TMD on Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temporomandibular_joint_disorder ):

Regular exercise such as running for 20 minutes 3 times a week, is extremely efficient in alleviating TMD brought about through stress-induced bruxism. Exercise essentially burns away the chemicals like cortisol and norepinephrine that cause stress so the unconscious mind no longer feels the need to relieve its stress through jaw-clenching.

After reading that, I recalled that I had periods of two to three months in 2010 where I didn't suffer from a TMJD-induced headache. Light bulb! I needed to get out and exercise again!

Now that I'm motivated I'm aiming to cycle a minimum of 60km per week. This is about 2.5hrs of exercise per week, mainly by going for 20km rides after work. I'm also going to try and hike most weekends. Ttypically these are 4-8 hrs duration.

I'm also going to start using the iManage Migraine app ( http://itunes.apple.com/app/imanage-migraine/id340537912?mt=8 ) on my iPhone to log details of pain episodes. That, together with my exercise diaries will hopefully give me some form of confirmation that regular exercise is the best treatment for my TMD.

That's my story. I hope that it's useful in some way. I'm happy for you to share the above without any identifying information.

I'm glad that I found your organization via Facebook as there aren't any TMD-focused community groups/organizations that I could find in Australia.

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