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National Academy of Medicine to Conduct a Study on Temporomandibular Disorders

We want you to be among the first to know that because of the advocacy efforts of The TMJ Association, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) will conduct a first-ever study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD).

Dentists in Distress

Fear of the dentist is practically a rite of passage in youth. Growing up, I wasn't exactly afraid of the dentist; rather, any excuse to leave school early was a powerful incentive. These days, I have a more complicated relationship with dentistry: I go to get answers and try to feel better, but I always pop a prophylactic ibuprofen or two in case my jaw protests from the oral gymnastics.

Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Patients Front and Center at the 2018 TMJ Patient-Led RoundTable

It is still all too fresh in the minds of many patients. Fifty years ago, between the 1970s and 1980s, some 10,000 TMJ patients received Vitek jaw implant devices.

Funding Opportunities now available for the NIH Common Fund’s Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program

The NIH Common Fund's Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program aims to understand the biological characteristics underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain and what makes some people susceptible and others resilient to the development of chronic pain.

NIH Workshop Focused on TMD and Overlapping Conditions

  • Jan 27, 2017

The focus of The TMJ Association's (TMJA) last three scientific meetings has been on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and pain conditions that a patient might get before or after being diagnosed with TMD. The recommendations from these meetings and advocacy action by members of the Chronic Pain Research Alliance (CPRA) have prompted the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to form a  trans-NIH committee to address these conditions. On August 13-14, 2012 the trans-NIH committee sponsored A Workshop on Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions, at the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The meeting was open to the research community.

TMJA President, Terrie Cowley, and the other members of the CPRA participated in the panel discussions addressing patients' concerns regarding the state of diagnosis and treatments of these conditions as well as research directions to advance understanding of these complex disorders. Conditions addressed at the workshop include chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic headache, endometriosis, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, irritable bowel syndrome, low back pain, Temporomandibular Disorders, and vulvodynia.

The goals of the workshop were to:

  1. Determine the state-of-the-science in chronic overlapping pain conditions;
  2. Develop a coordinated research strategy in order to identify standard features of chronic overlapping conditions that will drive the development of research diagnostic criteria;
  3. Improve and develop new research strategies to identify underlying mechanisms of etiology; trajectories of disease; risk factors for disease onset, progression and reversal; and outcome measures for these conditions.

We will share the formal workshop recommendations with you when we receive them.

TMJ Disorders

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In Treating TMJ

To view or order a free booklet about TMJ Disorders, visit the National Institutes of Health website.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Office of Research on Women's Health