Read the Latest News

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project The TMJ Association received the following request from Professor Justin Durham and his research team at Newcastle University. We encourage TMJ patients to participate in this project as it is an under researched

Drug Induced Bruxism

The authors of this article state that orofacial movement disorders (bruxism) are treated typically by dental professionals and not by those specialists (neurologists) researching and treating the other movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, tremors, etc.). Again, this is more evidence of the complexity of TMD and the need for multidisciplinary research and treatment in TMD.

Cervical Muscle Tenderness in Temporomandibular Disorders and Its Associations with Diagnosis, Disease-Related Outcomes, and Comorbid Pain Conditions

To analyze cervical tenderness scores (CTS) in patients with various temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and in controls and to examine associations of CTS with demographic and clinical parameters.

You, Your Esophagus and TMD

The esophagus is a roughly ten-inch hollow tube that descends from your throat through the diaphragm into the stomach. Normally, it is a one-way street transporting food you swallow to the stomach for digestion. But in GERD— Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease— the flow can reverse so that stomach contents (including gastric acids) are regurgitated upwards to cause a burning sensation (heartburn), nausea, pain and other distressing symptoms.

It's Time to Be Part of the Solution

The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) Study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) is well underway. We strongly encourage everyone affected by TMD to write to the NAM committee letting them know what it is like to live with TMD and your experiences with getting care.

NIH Workshop Focused on TMD and Overlapping Conditions

  • Jan 27, 2017

The focus of The TMJ Association's (TMJA) last three scientific meetings has been on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and pain conditions that a patient might get before or after being diagnosed with TMD. The recommendations from these meetings and advocacy action by members of the Chronic Pain Research Alliance (CPRA) have prompted the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to form a  trans-NIH committee to address these conditions. On August 13-14, 2012 the trans-NIH committee sponsored A Workshop on Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions, at the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The meeting was open to the research community.

TMJA President, Terrie Cowley, and the other members of the CPRA participated in the panel discussions addressing patients' concerns regarding the state of diagnosis and treatments of these conditions as well as research directions to advance understanding of these complex disorders. Conditions addressed at the workshop include chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic headache, endometriosis, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, irritable bowel syndrome, low back pain, Temporomandibular Disorders, and vulvodynia.

The goals of the workshop were to:

  1. Determine the state-of-the-science in chronic overlapping pain conditions;
  2. Develop a coordinated research strategy in order to identify standard features of chronic overlapping conditions that will drive the development of research diagnostic criteria;
  3. Improve and develop new research strategies to identify underlying mechanisms of etiology; trajectories of disease; risk factors for disease onset, progression and reversal; and outcome measures for these conditions.

We will share the formal workshop recommendations with you when we receive them.

TMJ Disorders

Comments:

Login or Register to add Comment