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Hyperreactive Brain Network May Be Cause of Chronic Pain in Fibromyalgia, Study Suggests

Fibromyalgia is one of the overlapping pain conditions with TMD. This article appeared in Fibromyalgia News Today on January 15, 2018. A new study suggests a hyperreactive brain network may be the underlying cause of chronic pain in fibromyalgia.

Dry Eye Linked to Chronic Overlapping Pain in Veteran Population

There may be a correlation between dry eye and chronic pain in the US military veteran population as is evident by a recent study. Ocular pain was most strongly associated with headaches, tension headaches, migraines, temporomandibular joint disorders, pelvic pain, central pain syndrome, and fibromyalgia in the veteran patient population.

Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Why Head and Face Pain Cause More Suffering

Hate headaches? The distress you feel is not all in your -- well, head. People consistently rate pain of the head, face, eyeballs, ears and teeth as more disruptive, and more emotionally draining, than pain elsewhere in the body.

Migraine and Coronary Artery Disease: A Genetic Connection

There has long been as association between migraine headaches and vascular (blood vessel) dysfunction of some kind, underscored by epidemiological studies and other research. New evidence for a genetic connection now comes from the analysis of several large data sets of each condition based on Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

Jenny: A Soldier Battles TMJ Disorders

  • May 13, 2015

My name is Jenny and I am a soldier in the United States Army. Yes, soldiers can have TMJ problems.  I am married and have one dog named Merlin (my second partner in crime). My story started out about six years ago when I had my initial bilateral sagittal split osteotomy.   I never had TMJ disorders or even heard of TMJ until then.

In 2003 while in the Army, I was given the opportunity to get braces. Since I wanted braces from the time I was a kid, I thought Why not. They’re free! Little did I know that I would need corrective surgery to complete my treatment plan. Between the years of 2003 to 2004 my treatment went along without any flaws until the day of my initial surgery which was a BSSO (bilateral sagittal split osteotomy). The day of surgery I had major complications which led my oral surgeon at the time to believe I would need a second surgery to correct the rest of my defect. Later that year, I had to do a change of duty station and my treatment and braces came off unexpectedly.

Once I arrived at my new duty station, I was placed back in braces and a second surgery was planned to correct the defect. Little did I know that I would have a long road ahead of me with many surgeries that were complicated with hardware failures and TMJ problems. My surgeries have ranged from BSSO (bilateral sagittal split osteotomy) to a lower jaw reconstruction then to a partial joint replacement. In order to see my current provider I have to drive over 100 miles each way. I also fly to another clinic to see the provider that performed my joint reconstruction. To date I have been diagnosed with and suffer from TMJ disorders, chronic facial pain and nerve damage. 

I have a strong support channel.  My husband has been through a lot with me.  I have to thank him and my family for keeping my spirits high. And my dog Merlin has kept me strong.

Many people ask if I would have the surgery again if I knew then what I know now. My answer is, I don’t know. I truly have mixed feelings. When I look in the mirror and see the scars and the facial deformity. I want to say no way would I ever do this again. Then I think about how this has made me a stronger person and how I would have never met some of the people that I did. The one thing that my mom keeps telling me is that “God would never give you anything he thought you couldn’t handle.”  

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