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National Academy of Medicine Study on Temporomandibular Disorders

The first meeting of the National Academy of Medicine Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment will be held Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at the National Academy of Sciences building in Washington, D.C.&

Attention Canadian TMJ Implant Patients

The Trial of the Class Action brought by Canadian patients who were implanted with Vitek Proplast TMJ implants, against Health Canada, alleging negligent regulation starts on April 1, 2019 in Toronto.

Long-term Changes in Biopsychosocial Characteristics Related to Temporomandibular Disorder: Findings from the OPPERA Study

The following article by Roger B. Fillingim, Gary D. Slade, Joel D. Greenspan, Ronald Dubner, William Maixner, Eric Bair, and Richard Ohrbach was published in the journal of Pain, November 2018. We are grateful to Dr. Fillingim for writing the following

National Academy of Medicine to Conduct a Study on Temporomandibular Disorders

We want you to be among the first to know that because of the advocacy efforts of The TMJ Association, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) will conduct a first-ever study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD).

Dentists in Distress

Fear of the dentist is practically a rite of passage in youth. Growing up, I wasn't exactly afraid of the dentist; rather, any excuse to leave school early was a powerful incentive. These days, I have a more complicated relationship with dentistry: I go to get answers and try to feel better, but I always pop a prophylactic ibuprofen or two in case my jaw protests from the oral gymnastics.

Magnesium & TMJ Disorders

  • Dec 25, 2013

What is Magnesium?

According to the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements, magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body and is essential to good health. Approximately 50% of total body magnesium is found in bone. The other half is found predominantly inside cells of body tissues and organs. Only 1% of magnesium is found in blood, but the body works very hard to keep blood levels of magnesium constant. Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, supports a healthy immune system, and keeps bones strong. Magnesium also helps regulate blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and is known to be involved in energy metabolism and protein synthesis.

What Does Science Say?

A 2008 study at Baylor University Medical Center looked at women with severe TMJ pain and noticed that 22% had a deficiency in magnesium. This study concluded that a poor diet and the inability to absorb nutrients contributed to the severity of the TMJ Disorder. Additionally, the University of Maryland Medical Center says calcium and magnesium supplements are often used to treat TMJ Disorders;  however, their role is unknown since no scientific evidence exists.

Ruling Out Other Medical Conditions

At present, there is no widely accepted, standard diagnostic test to identify all TMJ Disorders (TMD). Because the causes and symptoms are not definitive, diagnosing TMD to the exclusion of other medical conditions can be problematic. Acknowledging this, patients should try to rule out other conditions that could be contributing to their symptoms. Magnesium deficiency is just one example of the kind of TMD misdiagnosis that can result. Read more about diagnostics and misdiagnosis.

TMJ Disorders

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In Treating TMJ

To view or order a free booklet about TMJ Disorders, visit the National Institutes of Health website.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Office of Research on Women's Health