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Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Why Head and Face Pain Cause More Suffering

Hate headaches? The distress you feel is not all in your -- well, head. People consistently rate pain of the head, face, eyeballs, ears and teeth as more disruptive, and more emotionally draining, than pain elsewhere in the body.

Migraine and Coronary Artery Disease: A Genetic Connection

There has long been as association between migraine headaches and vascular (blood vessel) dysfunction of some kind, underscored by epidemiological studies and other research. New evidence for a genetic connection now comes from the analysis of several large data sets of each condition based on Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

Patients with Chronic Migraine More Likely to Suffer from TMD

In a recent study, researchers found that patients with chronic migraines which usually occur for more than 15 days a month are likely to experience three times more severe symptoms of Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) than patients with an episodic migraine.

Are you a TMD patient with Tinnitus?

It's a ringing sound, a buzzing, a hiss.... It can be soft or loud, intermittent or present all the time, affecting one ear or both. In whatever way it affects you, it's damned annoying, unpleasant, distracting. Indeed, it is considered the worst problem affecting human beings after pain and dizziness.

Marion: Conservative and Reversible Treatments Are Key

  • May 13, 2015

Facial pain and jaw pain were once a big part of my life. For a time, I thought it would be the end of me. Eventually, I recovered with patience, physical therapy and time.

This phrase saved my life: Treatments should be conservative, reversible and noninvasive. Following that advice allowed me to avoid harmful treatments. And eventually, I got better. That was more than 10 years ago and though I am normal again, I will always remember those difficult days.

I developed facial pain in 1997 when a dentist left a filling too high. He gave me a hard plastic splint to “re-position” my jaw. Bad idea! Most facial pain is muscular and will get better on its own with time and simple treatments. Unfortunately providers may treat with aggressive measures that cause more harm. That’s what happened to me.

The splint caused a permanent injury and left me in terrible pain. About this time I found The TMJ Association, which saved my life. The TMJ Association provided science-based, reliable information about facial pain and TMJ disorders. I also read a brochure from the National Institutes of Health with the life-changing phrase. “Treatments should be conservative, reversible and noninvasive.” The pain was very bad and I just wanted to feel better. Many of us reach that point and agree to harmful, costly treatments. When we don’t get better, we are often abandoned by our dental providers.

After discovering the TMJ Association and information from the National Institutes of Health, I felt hope. I saw a compassionate family doctor who prescribed physical therapy with a specially trained therapist. I got better and eventually, the pain was gone. These days, I have respectful dentist who understands my need to avoid wide opening and whose approaches are conservative.

Because of my gratitude to the TMJ Association, I became a patient volunteer several years ago. The TMJ Association patient support network offers a way for me to reach out and help others.

I have three dogs and three cats. I work as a freelance writer and enjoy running, swimming, hiking, yoga and music. I am a fan of House MD.

©2015 The TMJ Association, Ltd. All rights


In Treating TMJ

To view or order a free booklet about TMJ Disorders, visit the National Institutes of Health website.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Office of Research on Women's Health