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And the Committee heard from the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

At the end of the NAM meeting, Dr. Gregory Ness, representing the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAMOS) gave the following comments: “AAMOS welcomes the interest and support of the Academies, the NIH, NIDCR, FDA and The

What Allen Told the Committee

Allen Cowley addressed the second open-to-the-public meeting of the National Institute of Medicine's (NAM) Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) held on March 28, 2019 in Washington, DC. No stranger to the world of TMD, Dr. Cowley is the hus

Some Thoughts on Depression

It is hardly surprising that the chronic pain and limitations in function that many long-time TMJ patients experience can be accompanied by a state of depression, a sense of exhaustion and hopelessness.

Upcoming NAM Public Webinars on TMD

The National Academy of Medicine's (NAM) Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment is hosting two public web conferences on Wednesday, June 19 and Wednesday, July 31.   Webinar 1: Pati

The NAM Committee Heard from Patients, Too

At the March 28, 2019 public meeting NAM committee members had a chance to hear from TMD patients who had submitted testimony for the record.

What should you do if your jaw locks?

  • Nov 9, 2016

Although it is not the most common of TMJ problems, closed lock is very frightening for those who have it. In its most acute stage, the mouth is almost impossible to open because of both a physical block by a displaced disk and great pain. Because of this, surgery has long been the treatment of choice, since it was assumed that this was the only way to get the disk back in place. However, it was also known that symptoms can improve with simple symptom management, or a combination of symptom management and physical therapy. This prompted a group at the University of Minnesota to carry out a randomized clinical trial of four treatments for Closed Lock which we’ve posted for your review below.

Treatment of Closed Lock of the TMJ

A report on a paper by Schiffman, E.L. et al., Journal of Dental Reseach 86: 58-63, 2007

Written by Dr. James P. Lund, Professor, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Although it is not the most common of TMJ problems, closed lock is very frightening for those who have it. In its most acute stage, the mouth is almost impossible to open because of both a physical block by a displaced disk and great pain. Because of this, surgery has long been the treatment of choice, since it was assumed that this was the only way to get the disk back in place. However, it was also known that symptoms can improve with simple symptom management, or a combination of symptom management and physical therapy. This prompted a group at the University of Minnesota to carry out a randomized clinical trial of four treatments for Closed Lock: (Medical management); Rehabilitation,; Arthroscopy; and Arthroplasty. Medical management (MM) was pharmacological treatment of pain and inflammation with anti-inflammatory agents and analgesics, while Rehabilitation was a combination of MM with dental splints, physical therapy and psychology. Arthroscopy means inserting a small tube into the joint so that the surgeon can see inside, wash out the joint (lavage) and remove small pieces of tissue. In Arthroplasty, the joint is cut open so that the surgeon can remove larger pieces of tissue, which could be the whole TMJ disc and make repairs.

The scientists used two measures to quantify signs and symptoms, the Craniomandibular Index and Symptom Severity Index. The first measures movement, joint noises, tenderness of muscles and joints, while the second measures the pain- its intensity, tolerability, frequency and duration. They took measurements before treatment began, then at increasing intervals from the end of treatment to 5 years after treatment.

The main finding was that all four groups were much better 3 months after treatment, and that small improvements occurred out to 5 years. However, there was no difference between the four groups at any time during the study, which surprised a lot of people.

The authors concluded that, ”Primary treatment for patients with closed lock should consist of medical management  or rehabilitation” . However, it is hard for me to understand why they recommended rehabilitation because medical management is simpler, takes less time and costs much less. So there is really no justification in this study for anything more than managing inflammation and pain, which can be done by either a dentist or a physician.

 

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Comments:

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ilshapira - Friday, July 31, 2015
When a patient develops an acute close-lock it is possible to reduce it by stimulating the gag reflex. During a gag all the elevators of the mandible relax and the depressors and posterior cervical muscles contract . In the process the jaw opens straight down and can alleviate an acute close-lock. Sometimes no other treatment is necessary other than temporarily preventing full closure. This prevents the need of future invasive procedures. Symptom management without reduction of close lock is possible but reduction of the lock is superior It is essential to avoid, whenever possible invasive procedures to the TMJoint.