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And the Committee heard from the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

At the end of the NAM meeting, Dr. Gregory Ness, representing the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAMOS) gave the following comments: “AAMOS welcomes the interest and support of the Academies, the NIH, NIDCR, FDA and The

What Allen Told the Committee

Allen Cowley addressed the second open-to-the-public meeting of the National Institute of Medicine's (NAM) Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) held on March 28, 2019 in Washington, DC. No stranger to the world of TMD, Dr. Cowley is the hus

Some Thoughts on Depression

It is hardly surprising that the chronic pain and limitations in function that many long-time TMJ patients experience can be accompanied by a state of depression, a sense of exhaustion and hopelessness.

Upcoming NAM Public Webinars on TMD

The National Academy of Medicine's (NAM) Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment is hosting two public web conferences on Wednesday, June 19 and Wednesday, July 31.   Webinar 1: Pati

The NAM Committee Heard from Patients, Too

At the March 28, 2019 public meeting NAM committee members had a chance to hear from TMD patients who had submitted testimony for the record.

WHO TREATS TMD?

  • Oct 26, 2016

If you think you have a TMJ disorder, you may want to see a medical doctor to rule out some of the conditions that may mimic a TM disorder. For example, facial pain can be a symptom of many conditions, such as sinus or ear infections, decayed or abscessed teeth, various types of headache, facial neuralgia (nerve-related facial pain), and even tumors. If the medical doctor or your dentist gives you a diagnosis of a TMD, it is recommended that you consult our treatment section for guidance.

There is no medical or dental specialty of qualified experts trained in the care and treatment of TMD patients. As a result, there are no established standards of care in clinical practice. Although a variety of health care providers advertise themselves as “TMJ specialists,” the more than 50 different treatments available today are based largely on beliefs, not on scientific evidence.  Sir William Osler, the father of modern medicine, said "that when there are many treatments for a single condition, it is because none of them work."

Because there is no certified specialty in treating TMD in either dentistry or medicine, finding the right care can be difficult. The National Institutes of Health advises patients to look for a health care provider who understands musculoskeletal disorders (affecting muscle, bone and joints) and who is trained in treating pain conditions. Pain clinics in hospitals and universities are often a good source of advice, particularly when pain becomes chronic and interferes with daily life.

Complex cases, often marked by chronic and severe pain, jaw dysfunction, comorbid conditions, and diminished quality of life, will likely require a team of doctors from fields such as neurology, rheumatology, pain management and others to diagnose and treat this condition.

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