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Educational Brochures on Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions

This brochure addresses what are Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions (COPCs), how COPCs are diagnosed, the complexity of the chronic pain experience, and how to work with your health care provider to develop a treatment plan. It is available by postal ma

Study Highlights TMD Evidence and Current Practice Gaps

The TMJ Association has long championed the need for strong evidence-based demonstrations of the safety and efficacy of TMD diagnostics and treatments. Sad to say, as the following journal article indicates, even among a network of research-oriented practices, dental providers are still resorting to such TMD treatments as occlusal adjustments in which teeth are irreversibly moved, ground down, or in other ways altered, a treatment for which there is no scientific evidence of efficacy.

Beware of Ticks and Lyme Disease

We are currently in the peak season for Lyme disease. Each year at this time we highlight this topic because we have heard from a number of patients over the years who were misdiagnosed and underwent unnecessary TMD treatments when they actually had Lyme

#*!"@!**! ... May Help Your Pain... and Improve Strength!

Our headline is adopting the comic strip convention of using symbols to denote swear words because we are intrigued by a report that swearing may have some health benefits.

Predictors of Opioid Efficacy for Chronic Pain Patients

Opioids are increasingly used for treatment of chronic pain. However, they are only effective in a subset of patients and have multiple side effects. Thus, studies using biomarkers for response are highly warranted.

Teshania's Story

  • Dec 15, 2015

My name is Teshania, and I would like to share my TMJ story. Back in May 2012, I felt like I had an ear infection but also severe pain in my jaw. The pain was so bad that I could not close my mouth completely. I would hear a lot of popping in my ear as well and could not understand what was going on. I tried to associate the symptoms with allergies by taking different types of allergy medications, but they did not work. To make a long story short, I ended up seeing six doctors, an ENT specialist, a dentist and an orthodontist. They prescribed Naproxen, Robaxin, Tramadol, and a muscle relaxer. I was even fitted for a night guard. Two doctors told me I would just have to live with it. As a military spouse rather than a veteran, I was denied physical therapy.

Since then, the jaw pain and most of the popping in my ear has gone away. I still live with a feeling of tightness in my jaw joint. It does get bad at night, but I just deal with it. I exercise, do jaw exercises, stretch daily, and avoid hard foods. Also, I'm working on a soft food/no sugar meal plan. A bad habit of cheek chewing and phone cradling may explain why the discomfort hasn't completely gone away. To help, I just purchased a gel beaded TMJ relief head wrap. 

Praying for a cure, I hope I don't have to live the rest of my life with this discomfort.  I wish the same for others who are dealing with this disorder. Thanks for listening. 

©2015 The TMJ Association, Ltd. All rights

Comments:

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cmmessin56 - Saturday, October 31, 2015
I just wanted to let you know I am a US Air Force Veteran. My TMJ problems began in the Military in 1984. Multiple surgeries both jaws and medically discharged in 1992. I am greatful that my condition is treted very well from the VA Dental Clinic. My first thing I did after discharge was to apply for benefits. I just wanted to make sure my TMJ eould be tsjen care, as I new it would be very costly. I do not know how You and Other TMJ sufferers handle the pain physically amd mentally. Without my TMJ Oral Surgery Department Staff, I literally do not know what and where i would be now. Take care!

In Treating TMJ

To view or order a free booklet about TMJ Disorders, visit the National Institutes of Health website.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Office of Research on Women's Health