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Swallowing Changes Related to Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

To investigate whether chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients showed any changes in swallowing compared to a control group. Moreover, it was examined whether swallowing variables and a valid clinic measure of orofacial myofunctional status were associated.

National Academy of Medicine Holds Second TMD Meeting

We have reported previously about the decision of the prestigious National Academy of Medicine (NAM) to convene a committee of experts to examine all aspects of temporomandibular disorders (TMD).

What Does Blood Pressure Have to Do with Chronic Pain?

To understand this possible connection, you have to consider how blood pressure is normally controlled by the nervous system.

Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment

Public Workshop Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment

National Academy of Medicine Study on Temporomandibular Disorders: From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment

An ad hoc committee, under the auspices of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's Health and Medicine Division, has been convened to study temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a project entitled From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment.

Teshania's Story

  • Dec 15, 2015

My name is Teshania, and I would like to share my TMJ story. Back in May 2012, I felt like I had an ear infection but also severe pain in my jaw. The pain was so bad that I could not close my mouth completely. I would hear a lot of popping in my ear as well and could not understand what was going on. I tried to associate the symptoms with allergies by taking different types of allergy medications, but they did not work. To make a long story short, I ended up seeing six doctors, an ENT specialist, a dentist and an orthodontist. They prescribed Naproxen, Robaxin, Tramadol, and a muscle relaxer. I was even fitted for a night guard. Two doctors told me I would just have to live with it. As a military spouse rather than a veteran, I was denied physical therapy.

Since then, the jaw pain and most of the popping in my ear has gone away. I still live with a feeling of tightness in my jaw joint. It does get bad at night, but I just deal with it. I exercise, do jaw exercises, stretch daily, and avoid hard foods. Also, I'm working on a soft food/no sugar meal plan. A bad habit of cheek chewing and phone cradling may explain why the discomfort hasn't completely gone away. To help, I just purchased a gel beaded TMJ relief head wrap. 

Praying for a cure, I hope I don't have to live the rest of my life with this discomfort.  I wish the same for others who are dealing with this disorder. Thanks for listening. 

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Comments:

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cmmessin56 - Saturday, October 31, 2015
I just wanted to let you know I am a US Air Force Veteran. My TMJ problems began in the Military in 1984. Multiple surgeries both jaws and medically discharged in 1992. I am greatful that my condition is treted very well from the VA Dental Clinic. My first thing I did after discharge was to apply for benefits. I just wanted to make sure my TMJ eould be tsjen care, as I new it would be very costly. I do not know how You and Other TMJ sufferers handle the pain physically amd mentally. Without my TMJ Oral Surgery Department Staff, I literally do not know what and where i would be now. Take care!