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National Academy of Medicine Study on Temporomandibular Disorders

The first meeting of the National Academy of Medicine Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment will be held Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at the National Academy of Sciences building in Washington, D.C.&

Attention Canadian TMJ Implant Patients

The Trial of the Class Action brought by Canadian patients who were implanted with Vitek Proplast TMJ implants, against Health Canada, alleging negligent regulation starts on April 1, 2019 in Toronto.

Long-term Changes in Biopsychosocial Characteristics Related to Temporomandibular Disorder: Findings from the OPPERA Study

The following article by Roger B. Fillingim, Gary D. Slade, Joel D. Greenspan, Ronald Dubner, William Maixner, Eric Bair, and Richard Ohrbach was published in the journal of Pain, November 2018. We are grateful to Dr. Fillingim for writing the following

National Academy of Medicine to Conduct a Study on Temporomandibular Disorders

We want you to be among the first to know that because of the advocacy efforts of The TMJ Association, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) will conduct a first-ever study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD).

Dentists in Distress

Fear of the dentist is practically a rite of passage in youth. Growing up, I wasn't exactly afraid of the dentist; rather, any excuse to leave school early was a powerful incentive. These days, I have a more complicated relationship with dentistry: I go to get answers and try to feel better, but I always pop a prophylactic ibuprofen or two in case my jaw protests from the oral gymnastics.

Ann

  • Sep 21, 2016

This week has been a pretty painful week and whenever I have bad days I usually end up here so that I can read other people’s stories.  It doesn’t really help the pain, but it helps me stop feeling so sorry for myself for a while when I read the stories of people whose suffering far surpasses mine.  I keep waiting for some conclusion to my jaw problems before I tell my story, but I am beginning to think that if I wait, it will never be told.

I have suffered from jaw pain for several years.  In the beginning it was only bad during, and a few days after, a trip to the dentist.  Over the past couple of years, the ability to open my mouth wide has gotten worse and worse until the dentist I was using got verbally upset with me when I could not open my mouth wide enough to do a routine cleaning.  Prior to this I had complained of pain in a tooth that he said was dead and there was no way I could feel pain in it.  He ridiculed me and dismissed my concerns.  I shopped around and found a dentist that is very sympathetic and helpful.  He is patient and kind, but had no real experience with treating jaw pain, so suggested that I go to my doctor and get a referral for an oral surgeon, which I did.  The oral surgeon had a beam-cone scan and x-rays done and then stated that there was nothing to be found.  He scheduled me for arthrocentesis and when that did not help, he said there was nothing more to be done. 

By this time I was in constant pain, could not open my mouth far enough to get my little finger in and had lost close to 50 pounds.  My PCP referred me to a dentist that specialized in TMJ.   After much difficulty with the oral surgeon’s office, he finally got a copy of my records and found that the cone-beam  scan and x-rays indeed showed that I had advanced osteoarthritis in both joints to the point where both the condyles were flat and out of place.  He made a mold for a splint and suggested I try to find another surgeon.  He was super nice and advised that if the splint made my jaw hurt worse, to stop wearing it immediately.  It did, and I did.

The next several months were very frustrating trying to find someone to take a look at my condition.  I also complicated everything by taking too much ibuprofen and messed my stomach up, which made my jaw worse when I was constantly throwing up.

I finally obtained an appointment with an oral surgeon at UCSF, 3 hours away from my home.  He was very nice and ordered an MRI to see where the disc placements were and said that he would contact me once he reviewed them.  That was over six months ago.  At one point one of the residents contacted me and stated that they had lost the MRI disc and asked if I could obtain another one from the local imaging center, which I did and sent to them in the mail.  I called and confirmed that it was received.  I read the MRI report and it stated that the discs are nowhere to be seen, so I know that there is something going on in there.  I have called and emailed the hospital and doctor and have never gotten a return call or email.  The nice specialist that referred me has since retired and I have not been able to find anyone else to help.  I do go to a pain management specialist, which is a godsend.  I cannot imagine life without some relief, even if it is fleeting.    

I do not like to whine and complain, besides, it makes my jaw hurt.  Hah. 

I am thankful for a great husband and friends and neighbors who see through my humor and smiles to see the pain and suffering and do not turn away from it.  I am thankful for my horses and dogs who keep me active and remind me that there is still some happiness to be had.  And most of all I am happy for today’s technology that provides sites like tmj.org so that we can all share our stories.

Ann

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