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National Academy of Medicine Study on Temporomandibular Disorders

The first meeting of the National Academy of Medicine Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment will be held Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at the National Academy of Sciences building in Washington, D.C.&

Attention Canadian TMJ Implant Patients

The Trial of the Class Action brought by Canadian patients who were implanted with Vitek Proplast TMJ implants, against Health Canada, alleging negligent regulation starts on April 1, 2019 in Toronto.

Long-term Changes in Biopsychosocial Characteristics Related to Temporomandibular Disorder: Findings from the OPPERA Study

The following article by Roger B. Fillingim, Gary D. Slade, Joel D. Greenspan, Ronald Dubner, William Maixner, Eric Bair, and Richard Ohrbach was published in the journal of Pain, November 2018. We are grateful to Dr. Fillingim for writing the following

National Academy of Medicine to Conduct a Study on Temporomandibular Disorders

We want you to be among the first to know that because of the advocacy efforts of The TMJ Association, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) will conduct a first-ever study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD).

Dentists in Distress

Fear of the dentist is practically a rite of passage in youth. Growing up, I wasn't exactly afraid of the dentist; rather, any excuse to leave school early was a powerful incentive. These days, I have a more complicated relationship with dentistry: I go to get answers and try to feel better, but I always pop a prophylactic ibuprofen or two in case my jaw protests from the oral gymnastics.

TMJA's 8th Scientific Meeting

  • Mar 1, 2017

TMJA celebrated its 8th biennial scientific meeting this fall provocatively challenging
scientists to answer, "How Can Precision Medicine Be Applied to Temporomandibular
Disorders and its Comorbidities?" For three days scientists from fields outside TMD,
as well as some of the leaders you have read about in these News Bites, addressed
this question from multiple points of view. To set the stage, National Institutes of Health
(NIH) spokespersons explained exactly what precision medicine was all about. It is the
attempt to customize healthcare, with medical decisions, practices, and/or
products being tailored to the individual patient
.

To achieve that goal, a major new program, the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative,
under NIH leadership, has been launched to amass health data on a huge sample of
volunteers. No less than one million Americans--male, female, old, young, sorted by
race, ethnicity, geographic locale and socioeconomic status--will be recruited to work
with scientists to provide genetic information, electronic health records, and a range of
physiological, lifestyle and environmental data. This will take time, obviously, but the
experts say it is an effort that is doable now because of the rapid advances in
technology that make genome sequencing cheap and fast, the adoption of electronic
health records, and new techniques for gathering personal data on an individual using
sensors and devices that could be built into a smart phone app.

That said, attendees at the TMJA meeting heard speakers describe research on many
fronts. Among them: ways in which TMD patients with overlapping pain conditions may
be sorted into subsets with common characteristics that permit more selective targets
for treatment, new ways of delivering and testing drugs, further fine-tuning of chronic
pain pathways, more on interactions between the nervous and immune systems, and
new ways of modelling disease using stem cells. A summary of the meeting and
recommendations for future research will appear in  an upcoming issue of TMJ Science.

TMJ Disorders

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