Read the Latest News

TMJ Patient RoundTable Project: Status Update

The TMJ Association is acting as the catalyst to develop the TMJ Patient RoundTable, a broad initiative to advance the interests of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). It encompasses collaborations with all stakeholders and

Educational Brochures on Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions

This brochure addresses what are Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions (COPCs), how COPCs are diagnosed, the complexity of the chronic pain experience, and how to work with your health care provider to develop a treatment plan. It is available by postal ma

Study Highlights TMD Evidence and Current Practice Gaps

The TMJ Association has long championed the need for strong evidence-based demonstrations of the safety and efficacy of TMD diagnostics and treatments. Sad to say, as the following journal article indicates, even among a network of research-oriented practices, dental providers are still resorting to such TMD treatments as occlusal adjustments in which teeth are irreversibly moved, ground down, or in other ways altered, a treatment for which there is no scientific evidence of efficacy.

Beware of Ticks and Lyme Disease

We are currently in the peak season for Lyme disease. Each year at this time we highlight this topic because we have heard from a number of patients over the years who were misdiagnosed and underwent unnecessary TMD treatments when they actually had Lyme

#*!"@!**! ... May Help Your Pain... and Improve Strength!

Our headline is adopting the comic strip convention of using symbols to denote swear words because we are intrigued by a report that swearing may have some health benefits.

#*!"@!**! ... May Help Your Pain... and Improve Strength!

  • May 31, 2017

Our headline is adopting the comic strip convention of using symbols to denote swear words because we are intrigued by a report that swearing may have some health benefits. Certainly in our personal lives, we all have felt the satisfaction of exclaiming some forbidden expletive when hitting our thumb with a hammer or as a way of relieving the deep frustration we experience after standing in line and when you reach the box office discovering that the show you wanted to see is sold out. But as a way to reduce pain? and increase strength? Well maybe...

Psychology investigators at Britain's Keele University have conducted a series of investigations in which they found that swearing made individuals more tolerant of pain. They went on to test whether swearing also increased individuals' ability to perform intense exercise and also deepened the strength of their handgrips. 

They tested 29 people in an intense anaerobic exercise regimen and found that their power increased after they had used swear words at the outset compared with the same exercise conducted without swearing. Similarly, in a test of handgrip strength of 52 participants, they found that their grips were stronger following a bout of swearing compared with not swearing.

The investigators initially surmised that swearing stimulates the body's sympathetic nervous system-the fight-or-flight mechanism that increases heart rate and affects energy metabolism, among other things. But when they looked for typical sympathetic system changes they found nothing significant. So now it's back to the drawing board to search for answers. But their findings still hold.

Overlapping Conditions

Comments:

Login or Register to add Comment