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Hyperreactive Brain Network May Be Cause of Chronic Pain in Fibromyalgia, Study Suggests

Fibromyalgia is one of the overlapping pain conditions with TMD. This article appeared in Fibromyalgia News Today on January 15, 2018. A new study suggests a hyperreactive brain network may be the underlying cause of chronic pain in fibromyalgia.

Dry Eye Linked to Chronic Overlapping Pain in Veteran Population

There may be a correlation between dry eye and chronic pain in the US military veteran population as is evident by a recent study. Ocular pain was most strongly associated with headaches, tension headaches, migraines, temporomandibular joint disorders, pelvic pain, central pain syndrome, and fibromyalgia in the veteran patient population.

Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Why Head and Face Pain Cause More Suffering

Hate headaches? The distress you feel is not all in your -- well, head. People consistently rate pain of the head, face, eyeballs, ears and teeth as more disruptive, and more emotionally draining, than pain elsewhere in the body.

Migraine and Coronary Artery Disease: A Genetic Connection

There has long been as association between migraine headaches and vascular (blood vessel) dysfunction of some kind, underscored by epidemiological studies and other research. New evidence for a genetic connection now comes from the analysis of several large data sets of each condition based on Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

Study Highlights TMD Evidence and Current Practice Gaps

  • May 31, 2017

The TMJ Association has long championed the need for strong evidence-based demonstrations of the safety and efficacy of TMD diagnostics and treatments. Sad to say, as the following journal article indicates, even among a network of research-oriented practices, dental providers are still resorting to such TMD treatments as occlusal adjustments in which teeth are irreversibly moved, ground down, or in other ways altered, a treatment for which there is no scientific evidence of efficacy.

Dentist Practice Patterns and Therapeutic Confidence in the Treatment of Pain Related to Temporomandibular Disorders in a Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

Kakudate N, Yokoyama Y, Sumida F, Matsumoto Y, Gordan VV, Gilbert GH, Velly AM, Schiffman EL. 

J Oral Facial Pain Headache. 2017 Spring;31(2):152-158. doi: 10.11607/ofph.1730.




To quantify the practice patterns of Japanese dentists in the management of pain related to temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and to identify specific characteristics that are significantly associated with the decision to perform occlusal adjustment for TMD-related pain.


A cross-sectional study was conducted consisting of a questionnaire survey of dentists affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan (JDPBRN) (n = 148). Participants were asked how they diagnosed and treated TMD-related pain. Associations between dentist characteristics and the decision to perform occlusal adjustment were analyzed via multiple logistic regression.


A total of 113 clinicians responded to the questionnaire (76% response rate), and 81% of them (n = 89) had treated TMD during the previous year. Dentists treated an average of 1.9 ± 1.8 (mean ± SD) patients with TMD-related pain per month. Most JDPBRN dentists used similar diagnostic protocols, including questions and examinations. The most frequent treatments were splints or mouthguards (96.5%), medications (84.7%), and self-care (69.4%). Occlusal adjustment for TMD-related pain was performed by 58% of the participants. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two factors significantly associated with the decision to perform occlusal adjustment: dentist lack of confidence in curing TMD-related acute pain (odds ratio [OR] 5.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.260 to 24.861) and proportion of patients with severe TMD-related pain (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.909 to 0.999).


The most common treatments for TMD-related pain were reversible treatments; however, over half of the dentists performed occlusal adjustment for TMD-related pain. The results of this study suggest that an evidence-practice gap exists for occlusal adjustment for TMD-related pain.

TMJ Disorders


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