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Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Why Head and Face Pain Cause More Suffering

Hate headaches? The distress you feel is not all in your -- well, head. People consistently rate pain of the head, face, eyeballs, ears and teeth as more disruptive, and more emotionally draining, than pain elsewhere in the body.

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There has long been as association between migraine headaches and vascular (blood vessel) dysfunction of some kind, underscored by epidemiological studies and other research. New evidence for a genetic connection now comes from the analysis of several large data sets of each condition based on Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

Patients with Chronic Migraine More Likely to Suffer from TMD

In a recent study, researchers found that patients with chronic migraines which usually occur for more than 15 days a month are likely to experience three times more severe symptoms of Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) than patients with an episodic migraine.

Are you a TMD patient with Tinnitus?

It's a ringing sound, a buzzing, a hiss.... It can be soft or loud, intermittent or present all the time, affecting one ear or both. In whatever way it affects you, it's damned annoying, unpleasant, distracting. Indeed, it is considered the worst problem affecting human beings after pain and dizziness.

Predictors of Opioid Efficacy for Chronic Pain Patients

  • May 31, 2017

PLoS One. 2017; 12(2): e0171723.

Published online 2017 Feb 3. doi:  10.1371/journal.pone.0171723

PMCID: PMC5291530

Predictors of opioid efficacy in patients with chronic pain: A prospective multicenter observational cohort study

Kasper Grosen, Anne E. Olesen, Mikkel Gram, Torsten Jonsson, Michael Kamp-Jensen, Trine Andresen, Christian Nielsen, Gorazd Pozlep, Mogens Pfeiffer-Jensen, Bart Morlion, Asbjørn M. Drewes

Abstract

Opioids are increasingly used for treatment of chronic pain. However, they are only effective in a subset of patients and have multiple side effects. Thus, studies using biomarkers for response are highly warranted. The current study prospectively examined 63 opioid-naïve patients initiating opioid use for diverse types of chronic pain at five European centers. Quantitative sensory testing, electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, and assessment of pain catastrophizing were performed prior to treatment. The co-primary outcomes were change from baseline in ratings of chronic pain and quality of life after 14 days of opioid treatment. Secondary outcomes included patient's global impression of clinical change and side effects. Logistic regression models adjusted for age and sex were used to identify biomarkers predictive for successful treatment, defined as at least a 30% reduction in average pain intensity or an improvement in quality of life of at least 10 scale points. Fifty-nine patients (94%) completed the study. The mean age was 55 ± 16 years and 69% were females. Pain reduction was predicted by cold pain intensity (OR: 0.69; P = 0.01), pain catastrophizing (OR: 0.82; P = 0.03), relative delta (OR: 0.76; P = 0.03) and beta EEG activity (OR: 1.18; P = 0.04) induced by experimental cold pain. None of the study variables were related to improvement in quality of life. For the first time, individual pain processing characteristics have been linked to opioid response in a mixed chronic pain population. This has the potential to personalize treatment of chronic pain and restrict opioid use to patients with high likelihood for response.

Full article: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0171723 

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In Treating TMJ

To view or order a free booklet about TMJ Disorders, visit the National Institutes of Health website.

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