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National Academy of Medicine to Conduct a Study on Temporomandibular Disorders

We want you to be among the first to know that because of the advocacy efforts of The TMJ Association, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) will conduct a first-ever study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD).

Dentists in Distress

Fear of the dentist is practically a rite of passage in youth. Growing up, I wasn't exactly afraid of the dentist; rather, any excuse to leave school early was a powerful incentive. These days, I have a more complicated relationship with dentistry: I go to get answers and try to feel better, but I always pop a prophylactic ibuprofen or two in case my jaw protests from the oral gymnastics.

Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Patients Front and Center at the 2018 TMJ Patient-Led RoundTable

It is still all too fresh in the minds of many patients. Fifty years ago, between the 1970s and 1980s, some 10,000 TMJ patients received Vitek jaw implant devices.

Funding Opportunities now available for the NIH Common Fund’s Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program

The NIH Common Fund's Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program aims to understand the biological characteristics underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain and what makes some people susceptible and others resilient to the development of chronic pain.

TMJA's Sixth Scientific Meeting: A Paradigm Shift

  • Dec 19, 2013

The TMJA held its 6th international scientific conference June 5-7, 2011, at the Federation of Societies for Experimental Biology Conference Center in Bethesda, MD. 

The topic: Comorbid Chronic Pain Conditions—Mechanism, Diagnosis and Treatments—followed up on the Association’s scientific meeting of 2008, which initially explored the topic of comorbidities (conditions that occur together more often than chance can explain). In the interim, there has been further evidence that TMD patients often experience other chronic pain conditions, including endometriosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraine and chronic headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pelvic pain, vulvodynia, and interstitial cystitis.

The meeting was a resounding confirmation that there must be some underlying mechanism that links the conditions in question, and that the answer may lie in the nervous system.

Instead of looking for clues in the end organ—the jaw, the intestine, the reproductive tissues—the focus should be on how the nervous system has changed because of chronic pain, becoming hypersensitive and dysfunctional. This is a paradigm shift and attendees agreed it should inform how future research should be conducted.

The meeting was attended by scientists with unusually diverse research expertise in chronic pain disorders and other research areas. The significance of the meeting was underscored by the participation of seven National Institutes of Health Institutes, Office, and Center Directors; the leaders of four patient advocacy organizations comprising the Chronic Pain Research Alliance; and numerous NIH Program Staff. Following the formal presentations, attendees developed recommendations that are being disseminated to the research community.

Now that the pain issue has been brought to the forefront, the TMJA will encourage research to explore the interactions between the TM joint and the nervous system that give rise to chronic pain.

Overlapping Conditions

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