Read the Latest News

And the Committee heard from the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

At the end of the NAM meeting, Dr. Gregory Ness, representing the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAMOS) gave the following comments: “AAMOS welcomes the interest and support of the Academies, the NIH, NIDCR, FDA and The

What Allen Told the Committee

Allen Cowley addressed the second open-to-the-public meeting of the National Institute of Medicine's (NAM) Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) held on March 28, 2019 in Washington, DC. No stranger to the world of TMD, Dr. Cowley is the hus

Some Thoughts on Depression

It is hardly surprising that the chronic pain and limitations in function that many long-time TMJ patients experience can be accompanied by a state of depression, a sense of exhaustion and hopelessness.

Upcoming NAM Public Webinars on TMD

The National Academy of Medicine's (NAM) Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment is hosting two public web conferences on Wednesday, June 19 and Wednesday, July 31.   Webinar 1: Pati

The NAM Committee Heard from Patients, Too

At the March 28, 2019 public meeting NAM committee members had a chance to hear from TMD patients who had submitted testimony for the record.

TMJA's Sixth Scientific Meeting: A Paradigm Shift

  • Dec 19, 2013

The TMJA held its 6th international scientific conference June 5-7, 2011, at the Federation of Societies for Experimental Biology Conference Center in Bethesda, MD. 

The topic: Comorbid Chronic Pain Conditions—Mechanism, Diagnosis and Treatments—followed up on the Association’s scientific meeting of 2008, which initially explored the topic of comorbidities (conditions that occur together more often than chance can explain). In the interim, there has been further evidence that TMD patients often experience other chronic pain conditions, including endometriosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraine and chronic headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pelvic pain, vulvodynia, and interstitial cystitis.

The meeting was a resounding confirmation that there must be some underlying mechanism that links the conditions in question, and that the answer may lie in the nervous system.

Instead of looking for clues in the end organ—the jaw, the intestine, the reproductive tissues—the focus should be on how the nervous system has changed because of chronic pain, becoming hypersensitive and dysfunctional. This is a paradigm shift and attendees agreed it should inform how future research should be conducted.

The meeting was attended by scientists with unusually diverse research expertise in chronic pain disorders and other research areas. The significance of the meeting was underscored by the participation of seven National Institutes of Health Institutes, Office, and Center Directors; the leaders of four patient advocacy organizations comprising the Chronic Pain Research Alliance; and numerous NIH Program Staff. Following the formal presentations, attendees developed recommendations that are being disseminated to the research community.

Now that the pain issue has been brought to the forefront, the TMJA will encourage research to explore the interactions between the TM joint and the nervous system that give rise to chronic pain.

Overlapping Conditions

Comments:

Login or Register to add Comment

In Treating TMJ

To view or order a free booklet about TMJ Disorders, visit the National Institutes of Health website.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Office of Research on Women's Health